Monday, January 24, 2011

Winter Paintings by American Artist William Merritt Chase (1849-1916)

.
William Merritt Chase (1849-1916) Beatrice Clough Bachmann

William Merritt Chase (1849-1916) Portrait of a Woman 1885

William Merritt Chase (1849-1916) Mrs William Merritt Chase (Alice Bremond Gerson) 1890

William Merritt Chase (1849-1916) Contemplation 1889

William Merritt Chase (1849-1916) Mrs Leslie Cotton 1888

William Merritt Chase (1849-1916) A Lady in Brown

William Merritt Chase (1849-1916) Mrs William Merritt Chase (Alice Bremond Gerson) in a White Shawl

William Merritt Chase (1849-1916) Mrs William Merritt Chase (Alice Bremond Gerson) 1892

William Merritt Chase (1849-1916) Irene Dimock

William Merritt Chase (1849-1916) Lydia Field Ammet 1892
.

Tuesday, January 11, 2011

Reminiscing

.
Edward Lamson Henry (American Painter, 1841-1919) Memories 1873
Edward Lamson Henry (1841–1919) was an American genre painter born in Charleston, South Carolina who came to live in New York at an early age. As a painter of early American life, he displays a quaint humour. Henry acquired an extensive collection of antiques, old photos, & assorted Americana, from which he researched his paintings. His wife Frances said that "Nothing annoyed him more than to see a wheel, a bit of architecture etc. carelessly drawn or out of keeping with the time it was supposed to portray.”
.

Going to the Post Office

.Edward Lamson Henry (American Painter, 1841-1919) Cragsmoor Post Office 1903

Edward Lamson Henry (1841–1919) was an American genre painter born in Charleston, South Carolina who came to live in New York at an early age. As a painter of early American life, he displays a quaint humour. Henry acquired an extensive collection of antiques, old photos, & assorted Americana, from which he researched his paintings. His wife Frances said that "Nothing annoyed him more than to see a wheel, a bit of architecture etc. carelessly drawn or out of keeping with the time it was supposed to portray.”
.

Monday, January 10, 2011

Etiquette for American Ladies 1840 - Receive Guests in the Parlour NOT the Dining Room


Etiquette for Ladies: With Hints on the Preservation, Improvement, and Display of Female Beauty. Published by Lea and Blanchard, Philadelphia. 1838-1840

In a house where affluence abounds, it is indispensable to have a drawing-room; if that cannot be afforded, then let the receiving room be the parlour.

To receive company in a dining-room is not allowed, except among those who cannot bear the expense of furnishing a parlour or drawing-room. Simplicity admitted into an apartment of this kind, suited to smallness of means, we cannot but approve, while we regret, nevertheless the disagreeable things to which such a residence subjects the parties.

But we have, in this respect, an express warning to hold out to people who give themselves up to it unnecessarily, for it is altogether opposed to the received usages of good society to put yourselves in a situation which you cannot adorn; then you are exposed to receiving twenty visits during dinner, of seeing as many interruptions during the setting of your table, since it is impossible to spread the cloth properly, etc. while strangers remain; finally, of having them witness your domestic cares while removing the remains of a repast, the table-cloth, dishes, etc
.

Sunday, January 9, 2011

Etiquette for American Ladies 1840 - On Receiving Guests At Home


Etiquette for Ladies: With Hints on the Preservation, Improvement, and Display of Female Beauty. Published by Lea and Blanchard, Philadelphia. 1838-1840

To receive visitors with ease and elegance, and in such a manner that every thing in you, and about you, shall partake of propriety and grace,— to endeavour that people may always be satisfied when they leave you, and be desirous to come again, — are the obligations of the master, and especially of the mistress, of a house.

Every thing in the house ought, as far as possible, to offer solid comfort, and true grace.

Perfect order, exquisite neatness and elegance, which easily dispense with being sumptuous, ought to mark the entrance of the house, the furniture, and the dress of the lady.
.

Saturday, January 8, 2011

More 19th-Century American Women & Their Offspring by Ammi Phillips (1788-1865)

.
Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) c 1836 Ammi Phillips. Augusta Maria Foster

Ammi Phillips (1788–1865) Mrs Day

Ammi Phillips (1788–1865) Hannah Bull Thompson

Ammi Phillips (1788–1865) Jeanette Payne

Ammi Phillips (1788–1865) Mary Elizabeth Smith

Ammi Phillips (1788–1865) Old Woman with a Bible

Ammi Phillips (1788–1865) Wife of the Journalist

Ammi Phillips (1788–1865) Young Girl and Her Cat

Ammi Phillips (1788–1865) Portrait of a Woman



.

Etiquette for American Ladies 1840 - Too Much Propriety


Etiquette for Ladies: With Hints on the Preservation, Improvement, and Display of Female Beauty. Published by Lea and Blanchard, Philadelphia. 1838-1840

Moderation in everything is so essential, that it is even a violation of propriety itself, to affect too much the observance of it. It is to propriety, its justice and attractions, that we owe all the charm of sociality... In an assemblage of truly polite people, all evil seems to be unknown; what is just, estimable, and good, or what we call fit or suitable, is felt on all sides; actions, manners, and language, alike indicate it.

And if we place in this select assembly, one who is a stranger to the advantages of a polite education, she will at once be made sensible of the value of it, and will immediately desire to display the same urbanity by which she has been pleased.

If politeness is necessary in general, it is not less so in particular cases. Neither rank, talents, fortune, nor beauty, can dispense with this amenity of manners; nor can anything inspire regard or love, without graceful affability, mild dignity, and elegant simplicity...a kind smile, or an affectionate tone, penetrates the heart more deeply than the most brilliant elocution.

As to the technical part of politeness, or forms alone, the intercourse of society, and good advice, are undoubtedly useful; but the grand secret of never failing in propriety of deportment, is to have an intention of always doing what is right. With such a disposition of mind, exactness in observing what is proper appears to all to possess a charm and influence; and then not only do mistakes become excusable, but they become even interesting from their thoughtlessness and naivete. Be, therefore, modest and benevolent, and do not distress yourself on account of the mistakes of your inexperience; a little attention, and the advice of a friend, will soon correct these trifling errors.
.

Friday, January 7, 2011

American Women & Their Families by Henry Benbridge 1743-1812

.
Henry Benbridge (1743-1812). Margaret Cantey (Mrs. John Peyre).
Henry Benbridge (1744–1812), early American portrait painter, was born in Philadelphia, the only child of James & Mary (Clark) Benbridge. When he was 7 years old, his widowed mother married Thomas Gordon, a wealthy Scot. The boy's artistic talent was encouraged, as he made decorative designs for his stepfather's drawing-room.

Henry Benbridge (1743-1812) Gordon Family (his stepfather & mother Mary Clark Benbridge Gordon) 1763-65
When he was 21, Benbridge was sent to Italy, where he studied with Pompeo Batoni & Anton Raphael Mengs. From there he journeyed to London before returning to Philadelphia. Like other young Americans he was encouraged by Benjamin West. He wrote, on December 7, 1769, to his stepfather: "Upon my arrival I waited upon Mr. West who received me with a sort of brotherly affection, as did my cousin, Mrs. West." He left England in 1770, bearing from West the following note of recommendation to Francis Hopkinson: "By Mr. Benbridge you will receive these few lines. You will find him an Ingenous artist and an agreeable Companion. His merit in the art must procure him great incouragement and much esteem. I deare say it will give you great pleasure to have an ingenous artist resident amongst you."Henry Benbridge (1743-1812) Mrs Charles Coteworth Pinckney Sarah Middleton Benbridge 1773In Philadelphia, Benbridge married & was admitted to membership in the American Philosophical Society in 1771. Suffering from asthma & the cold of Philadelphia, he moved to Charleston, South Carolina, where he succeeded Jeremiah Theus as the region's popular portrait painter. Around 1800 Benbridge relocated to Norfolk, Virginia, & made frequent visits to his native Philadelphia. At Norfolk he gave Thomas Sully his first lessons in oil painting. Earlier in Charleston, he had instructed Thomas Coram. Sully described his master as "a portly man of good address–gentlemanly in his deportment."
Henry Benbridge (1743-1812) Archibald Bulloch Family 1775
Benbridge, who had certainly seen the lastest opulent fashion trends, as he studied in Italy with Pompeo Batoni & in England with expatriate Benjamin West, had a distrust of the trendy fashionable. In 1770, when his sisters were nearing marrying age, Benbridge wrote his mother from London, that his sisters "should not refuse a good plain honest Country farmer if such a one should offer himself with tolerable good estate, for one of the town who perhaps may have a better taste for dress, but not more merit, if perhaps as much."
1784 Henry Benbridge (1743-1812). Rachel Moore (Mrs. William Allston II).
When Benbridge had returned from Europe settling in Charlestown, South Carolina, to make a living painting portraits, he wrote to his sister Betsy in 1773, "Every kind of news here is very dull, the only thing attended to is dress and dissipation, & if I come in for a share of their superfluous Cash, I have no right to find fault with them, as it turns out to my advantage."
1790 Henry Benbridge (743-1812). Mary Boyer (Mrs. Robert Shewell).

In 1785, Benbridge, who loved the simple pleasures of gardening, was still worried about the too fancy dress of his son, Harry, whom Benbridge lovingly called "my little fellow." He wrote to his sister that he felt that his wife was dressing him in "too good things for a boy like him to wair, & likewise too many of them at once; he can't take care of them when he is at play & more common & Strong stuff in my Opinion would answer much better, & not fill his head with foolish notions of dress, which perhaps may be his bane."
1780s Henry Benbridge (1743-1812). Elizabeth Allston (Mrs. William H. Gibbes).
It is not surprising that Benbridge painted many of his female clients in dignified classical gowns looking serious, thoughtful, & restrained.

Henry Benbridge (1743-1812). Lady of the Middleton Family. 1780s Henry Benbridge (1743-1812) Enoch Edwards Family 1779
Henry Benbridge (1743-1812) Mrs Benjamin Simons 1771-76
Henry Bendridge (1743-1812). The Hartley Family. 1787
Henry Benbridge (1743-1812). Sarah White (Mrs. Isaac Chanler). 1770s
Henry Benbridge (1743-1812 The Tannant Family 1770s
Attributed to Henry Benbridge (1743-1812). Rebecca Lloyd (Mrs Edward Davies) 1770s
Henry Benbridge (1743-1812) Mary Bryan Morel and Her Children c 17773
Henry Benbridge (1743-1812) Allegorical Portrait of Sarah Flagg c 1774
Henry Benbridge (1743-1812). Mrs. Mumford Milner (Elizabeth Brewton) b 1786
Henry Benbridge (1743-1812) Rebecca Gordon (his half sister) 1770s
Henry Benbridge (1743-1812) Elizabeth Ann Timothy Mrs William Williamson c 1775-85
1770s Henry Benbridge (1743-1812). Charlotte Pepper (Mrs. James Gignilliat)..

Etiquette for American Ladies 1840 - The Propriety of Deportment


Etiquette for Ladies: With Hints on the Preservation, Improvement, and Display of Female Beauty. Published by Lea and Blanchard, Philadelphia. 1838-1840

Propriety of deportment...is a happy union of the moral and the graceful, and should be considered in two points of view; it ought, therefore, to direct us in our important duties, as well as in our more trifling enjoyments.

When we regard it only under this last aspect, some contend that mere intercourse with the world gives a habit and taste for those modest and obliging observances which constitute true politeness; but this is an error. Propriety of deportment is the valuable result of a knowledge of one's self, and of respect for the rights of others; it is a feeling of the sacrifices which are imposed on self esteem by our own social relations; it is, in short, a sacred requirement of harmony and affection.

But the usage of the world is merely the gloss, or rather the imitation of propriety; and when not based upon sincerity, modesty, and courtesy, it consists in being inconstant in every thing, and amusing itself by playing off its feelings and ridicule against the defects and excellencies of others. Thanks to custom, — it is sufficient, in order to be recognised as amiable, that she who is the subject of a malicious pleasantry may laugh as well as the author of it.

The usage of the world is, therefore, often nothing: more than a skilful calculation of vanity, a futile game, a superficial observance of form, a false politeness, which would lead to frivolity or perfidy, did not true politeness animate it with delicacy, reserve, and benevolence. Would that custom had never been separated from this virtuous amiability! We should then never see well intentioned, and good people, suspicious of politeness; and when victims to the deceitful, justly exclaim with bitterness, "This is your woman of politeness!" nor should we ever have made a distinction between the fixed principles of virtue, and what is fit and expedient.

The love of good, in a word, virtue, is then the soul of politeness; and the feeling of a just harmony, between our interest and our social relations, is indispensable to this agreeable quality. Excessive gaiety, extravagant joy, great depression, anger, love, jealousy, avarice, and generally all the passions, are too often dangerous shoals to propriety of deportment.
.

Thursday, January 6, 2011

Etiquette for American Ladies 1840 - Avoid Indelicate Expressions


Etiquette for Ladies: With Hints on the Preservation, Improvement, and Display of Female Beauty. Published by Lea and Blanchard, Philadelphia. 1838-1840

Avoid all indelicate expressions, and appear not to understand any that may be uttered in your presence. Some ladies not only relish double entendres, but actually use them. Yet, however much it may create a feeling of cleverness at the moment, cool reflection is afterwards sure to condemn it both on the part of the speaker and listener. Such discourse, wanton glances, and lightness of carriage, are considered by men as gauntlets to dare them to speak and act in a more free and unguarded manner than they otherwise would have the boldness to do.

Let it be impressed upon your mind, that many ladies have lost their character through a little indiscretion on these heads—and it is as bad with the world to appear to have lost caste, as really to have lost it.
.

Wednesday, January 5, 2011

Etiquette for American Ladies 1840 - On Polite Reserve


Etiquette for Ladies: With Hints on the Preservation, Improvement, and Display of Female Beauty. Published by Lea and Blanchard, Philadelphia. 1838-1840

Remember that the principal beauty in the female character, is modesty to all, and polite reserve to those you know little regarding; modesty is of itself so beautiful, that it often conquers when a pretty face or a handsome form is overlooked.

Never be afraid to blush when the feeling is genuine, but never affect to blush when you do not feel it—remember that blushing is more frequently the attendant of innocence than of guilt .

Modesty does not only show itself in the face, but also in the dress, and more particularly in the manner, and is always a proof of good and liberal education; no lady can be polite who is not modest and retiring; female politeness is itself the very essence of modesty.

It is much better for a lady to say too little in company than too much; her conversation should always be consistent with her sex and age; and although it may sometimes be bright and witty, yet it should not always be so.

Men frequently look with a jealous eye on a learned woman, and are apt to denominate her a blue; be cautious, therefore, in a mixed company of showing yourself too much beyond those around you. To a mind well formed there is more real pleasure derived from the silent consciousness of superiority, than in the ostentatious display of it . It is possible to be silent, and yet not dull,—the silent eyes are often a more powerful conqueror than the noisy tongue; but be not, therefore, apparently careless to the conversation of others,— es the eyes can tell whether you are absent or not, although the mouth gives no audible token of presence.
.

Tuesday, January 4, 2011

Etiquette for American Ladies 1840 - The Letter of Introduction


Etiquette for Ladies: With Hints on the Preservation, Improvement, and Display of Female Beauty. Published by Lea and Blanchard, Philadelphia. 1838-1840

Be very cautious of giving a gentleman a letter of introduction to a lady; for remember, in proportion as you are esteemed by the lady to whom it is addressed, so do you claim for your friend her good wishes,—and such letters are often the means of settling the weal or the woe of the parties for life. Ladies should never themselves, unless upon cases of the most urgent business, deliver introductory letters, but should send them in an envelope inclosing their card.

On receipt of an introductory letter, take it into instant consideration; if you are determined not to receive the party, write at once some polite, plausible, but dignified cause of excuse. If the party is one you think fit to receive, then let your answer be accordingly, and without delay; never leave unanswered till the next day a letter of introduction.

If any one whom you have never seen before call with a letter of introduction, and you know from its appearance who sent it, desire the person to sit down, and at once treat them politely; but if you do not recognise the hand-writing, it is quite proper, after requesting them to be seated, to beg their pardon, and peruse the letter in order that you may know how to act .

It is now, however, a very rare thing for any one to call upon a lady with an introductory letter; no one the least conversant with the rules of good society will do it; such letters ought to be sent in an envelope.

If any one requests a letter of introduction, and you do not consider that it would be prudent, either in respect to your situation with the person so requesting' it, or with the one to whom it would be addressed, refuse it with firmness, and allow no inducement whatever to alter your purpose.
.

American Women & Children by the Beardsley Limner (active between 1785-1805)

.
The Beardsley Limner (American painter, active 1785-1805 possibly Sarah Bushnell Perkins 1771-1831) Boy with Dog

The Beardsley Limner (American painter, active 1785-1805 possibly Sarah Bushnell Perkins 1771-1831) Harmony Child Mrs Oliver Wright

The Beardsley Limner, an American painter active 1785-1805, was an itinerant artist who executed several naive portraits along the old Boston Post Road, in Connecticut & Massachusetts, from about 1785 to 1805. This name is derived from portraits this artist made of Elizabeth & Hezekiah Beardsley. The Beardsley Limner may actually be a Connecticut pastelist Sarah Perkins. Some stylistic similarities exist between the two, but there are sufficient differences to raise questions about a definitive identification. Works shown here are attributed to the Beardsley Limner.

The Beardsley Limner (American painter, active 1785-1805 possibly Sarah Bushnell Perkins 1771-1831)

The Beardsley Limner (American painter, active 1785-1805 possibly Sarah Bushnell Perkins 1771-1831) Elizabeth Davis Mrs Hezekiah Beardsley 1789

The Beardsley Limner (American painter, active 1785-1805 possibly Sarah Bushnell Perkins 1771-1831) Child Posing with Cat 1790s

The Beardsley Limner (American painter, active 1785-1805 possibly Sarah Bushnell Perkins 1771-1831) Boy in a Windsor Chair

The Beardsley Limner (American painter, active 1785-1805 possibly Sarah Bushnell Perkins 1771-1831) Girl In a Pink Dress 1790
The Beardsley Limner (American painter, active 1785-1805 possibly Sarah Bushnell Perkins 1771-1831)
The Beardsley Limner (American painter, active 1785-1805 possibly Sarah Bushnell Perkins 1771-1831) Charles Adams Wheeler, c. 1790
The Beardsley Limner (American painter, active 1785-1805 possibly Sarah Bushnell Perkins 1771-1831) Girl in Lace Cap 1790s
.