Tuesday, December 7, 2010

Our Grandchildren's Chickens

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Winslow Homer (American artist, 1836-1910) Fresh Eggs

Just in time for the holidays, our grandchildren's 11 chickens are finally all producing an egg each daily. While the chicks are searching for new places to hide their productions each day, we are all scrambling to find new egg recipes.

Thomas Waterman Wood (American artist, 1823–1903) Fresh Eggs

Thomas Waterman Wood (American artist, 1823–1903) Not an Egg
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Saturday, December 4, 2010

Paintings of Women by John Vanderlyn (American Neoclassical Painter, 1775-1852)

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John Vanderlyn (American Neoclassical Painter, 1775-1852) Mary Scott Swan 1815

John Vanderlyn (American Neoclassical Painter, 1775-1852) Sarah Russell Church 1800

John Vanderlyn (American Neoclassical Painter, 1775-1852) Theodosia Burr

Theodosia Burr Alston was the daughter of Aaron Burr. She was educated at home by her father & was able to write fluently in Greek & Latin, as well as French & English. Aaron Burr was ahead of his time in believing that a young woman should be given the opportunity to receive the same education as a man.

When Theodosia was 17 years old, & her father was about to become Vice President under Thomas Jefferson, (both had received the same number of votes in the electoral college while running for president), Theodosia married Joseph Alston, the governor of South Carolina. They honeymooned at Niagra Falls, the first known American couple to do so. Their son, Aaron Burr Alston ("Gampy"), was born in the following year.


John Vanderlyn (American Neoclassical Painter, 1775-1852) Mother and Son 1800

John Vanderlyn (American Neoclassical Painter, 1775-1852) Mrs Marinus Willett and Her Son Marinus Jr 1802

John Vanderlyn (American Neoclassical Painter, 1775-1852) Elizabeth Maria Church 1799

John Vanderlyn (American Neoclassical Painter, 1775-1852) Theodosia Burr Alston

John Vanderlyn (American Neoclassical Painter, 1775-1852) Mary Ellis Bell (Mrs Isaac Bell) 1827

John Vanderlyn (American Neoclassical Painter, 1775-1852) Mrs. Daniel Strobel, Jr. (Anna Church Strobel) and Her Son George, ca. 1799

John Vanderlyn (American Neoclassical Painter, 1775-1852) was born at Kingston, New York. He was employed by a print-seller in New York, and was first instructed in art by Archibald Robinson (1765–1835), a Scotsman who was afterwards one of the directors of the American Academy of the Fine Arts. He went to Philadelphia, where he spent time in the studio of Gilbert Stuart and copied some of Stuart's portraits, including one of Aaron Burr, who placed him under Gilbert Stuart as a pupil.

In 1796, Aaron Burr sent Vanderlyn to Paris, where he studied for 5 years. He returned to the United States in 1801 and lived in the home of Burr, then the Vice President, where he painted the well-known likeness of Burr and his daughter.

John Vanderlyn (American Neoclassical Painter, 1775-1852) Self Portrait
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Saturday, November 20, 2010

Sitting in the Parlor

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Edward Lamson Henry (American Painter, 1841-1919) Parlor on Brooklyn Heights of Mr and Mrs John Ballard 1872

Edward Lamson Henry (1841–1919) was an American genre painter born in Charleston, South Carolina who came to live in New York at an early age. As a painter of early American life, he displays a quaint humour. Henry acquired an extensive collection of antiques, old photos, & assorted Americana, from which he researched his paintings. His wife Frances said that "Nothing annoyed him more than to see a wheel, a bit of architecture etc. carelessly drawn or out of keeping with the time it was supposed to portray.”
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Reading by the Fire

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Edward Lamson Henry (American Painter, 1841-1919) Reading by the Fire 1872

Edward Lamson Henry (1841–1919) was an American genre painter born in Charleston, South Carolina who came to live in New York at an early age. As a painter of early American life, he displays a quaint humour. Henry acquired an extensive collection of antiques, old photos, & assorted Americana, from which he researched his paintings. His wife Frances said that "Nothing annoyed him more than to see a wheel, a bit of architecture etc. carelessly drawn or out of keeping with the time it was supposed to portray.”
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Riding Down Main Street

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Edward Lamson Henry (American Painter, 1841-1919) Horse and Buggy on Main Street

Edward Lamson Henry (1841–1919) was an American genre painter born in Charleston, South Carolina who came to live in New York at an early age. As a painter of early American life, he displays a quaint humour. Henry acquired an extensive collection of antiques, old photos, & assorted Americana, from which he researched his paintings. His wife Frances said that "Nothing annoyed him more than to see a wheel, a bit of architecture etc. carelessly drawn or out of keeping with the time it was supposed to portray.”
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Resting the Horses

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Edward Lamson Henry (American Painter, 1841-1919) Horse and Buggy

Edward Lamson Henry (1841–1919) was an American genre painter born in Charleston, South Carolina who came to live in New York at an early age. As a painter of early American life, he displays a quaint humour. Henry acquired an extensive collection of antiques, old photos, & assorted Americana, from which he researched his paintings. His wife Frances said that "Nothing annoyed him more than to see a wheel, a bit of architecture etc. carelessly drawn or out of keeping with the time it was supposed to portray.”
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Waiting for the Ferry

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Edward Lamson Henry (American Painter, 1841-1919) Waiting for the Ferry

Edward Lamson Henry (1841–1919) was an American genre painter born in Charleston, South Carolina who came to live in New York at an early age. As a painter of early American life, he displays a quaint humour. Henry acquired an extensive collection of antiques, old photos, & assorted Americana, from which he researched his paintings. His wife Frances said that "Nothing annoyed him more than to see a wheel, a bit of architecture etc. carelessly drawn or out of keeping with the time it was supposed to portray.”
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Coming Home

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Edward Lamson Henry (American Painter, 1841-1919) Coming Home

Edward Lamson Henry (1841–1919) was an American genre painter born in Charleston, South Carolina who came to live in New York at an early age. As a painter of early American life, he displays a quaint humour. Henry acquired an extensive collection of antiques, old photos, & assorted Americana, from which he researched his paintings. His wife Frances said that "Nothing annoyed him more than to see a wheel, a bit of architecture etc. carelessly drawn or out of keeping with the time it was supposed to portray.”
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Children Resting 1879

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Edward Lamson Henry (American Painter, 1841-1919) Childhood 1879

Edward Lamson Henry (1841–1919) was an American genre painter born in Charleston, South Carolina who came to live in New York at an early age. As a painter of early American life, he displays a quaint humour. Henry acquired an extensive collection of antiques, old photos, & assorted Americana, from which he researched his paintings. His wife Frances said that "Nothing annoyed him more than to see a wheel, a bit of architecture etc. carelessly drawn or out of keeping with the time it was supposed to portray.”
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Riding in the Carriage

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Edward Lamson Henry (American Painter, 1841-1919) Carriage Ride 1886

Edward Lamson Henry (1841–1919) was an American genre painter born in Charleston, South Carolina who came to live in New York at an early age. As a painter of early American life, he displays a quaint humour. Henry acquired an extensive collection of antiques, old photos, & assorted Americana, from which he researched his paintings. His wife Frances said that "Nothing annoyed him more than to see a wheel, a bit of architecture etc. carelessly drawn or out of keeping with the time it was supposed to portray.”
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Watering the Horse

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Edward Lamson Henry (American Painter, 1841-1919) At the Watering Trough 1899

Edward Lamson Henry (1841–1919) was an American genre painter born in Charleston, South Carolina who came to live in New York at an early age. As a painter of early American life, he displays a quaint humour. Henry acquired an extensive collection of antiques, old photos, & assorted Americana, from which he researched his paintings. His wife Frances said that "Nothing annoyed him more than to see a wheel, a bit of architecture etc. carelessly drawn or out of keeping with the time it was supposed to portray.”
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Reading at Home

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Edward Lamson Henry (American Painter, 1841-1919) At Home with a Good Book 1872

Edward Lamson Henry (1841–1919) was an American genre painter born in Charleston, South Carolina who came to live in New York at an early age. As a painter of early American life, he displays a quaint humour. Henry acquired an extensive collection of antiques, old photos, & assorted Americana, from which he researched his paintings. His wife Frances said that "Nothing annoyed him more than to see a wheel, a bit of architecture etc. carelessly drawn or out of keeping with the time it was supposed to portray.”
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Visiting With Those Passing-By

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Edward Lamson Henry (American Painter, 1841-1919) An Informal Call 1895

Edward Lamson Henry (1841–1919) was an American genre painter born in Charleston, South Carolina who came to live in New York at an early age. As a painter of early American life, he displays a quaint humour. Henry acquired an extensive collection of antiques, old photos, & assorted Americana, from which he researched his paintings. His wife Frances said that "Nothing annoyed him more than to see a wheel, a bit of architecture etc. carelessly drawn or out of keeping with the time it was supposed to portray.”
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Come On In...

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Edward Lamson Henry (American Painter, 1841-1919) A Philadelphia Doorway 1882

Edward Lamson Henry (1841–1919) was an American genre painter born in Charleston, South Carolina who came to live in New York at an early age. As a painter of early American life, he displays a quaint humour. Henry acquired an extensive collection of antiques, old photos, & assorted Americana, from which he researched his paintings. His wife Frances said that "Nothing annoyed him more than to see a wheel, a bit of architecture etc. carelessly drawn or out of keeping with the time it was supposed to portray.”
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Putting Up Hay in Pennsylvania

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Edward Lamson Henry (American Painter, 1841-1919) Barnyard in Pennsylvania

Edward Lamson Henry (1841–1919) was an American genre painter born in Charleston, South Carolina who came to live in New York at an early age. As a painter of early American life, he displays a quaint humour. Henry acquired an extensive collection of antiques, old photos, & assorted Americana, from which he researched his paintings. His wife Frances said that "Nothing annoyed him more than to see a wheel, a bit of architecture etc. carelessly drawn or out of keeping with the time it was supposed to portray.”
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Talking with the Lawyer

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Edward Lamson Henry (American Painter, 1841-1919) A Country Lawyer 1895

Edward Lamson Henry (1841–1919) was an American genre painter born in Charleston, South Carolina who came to live in New York at an early age. As a painter of early American life, he displays a quaint humour. Henry acquired an extensive collection of antiques, old photos, & assorted Americana, from which he researched his paintings. His wife Frances said that "Nothing annoyed him more than to see a wheel, a bit of architecture etc. carelessly drawn or out of keeping with the time it was supposed to portray.”
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At School 1889

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Edward Lamson Henry (American Painter, 1841-1919) Kept In 1889


Edward Lamson Henry (1841–1919) was an American genre painter born in Charleston, South Carolina who came to live in New York at an early age. As a painter of early American life, he displays a quaint humour. Henry acquired an extensive collection of antiques, old photos, & assorted Americana, from which he researched his paintings. His wife Frances said that "Nothing annoyed him more than to see a wheel, a bit of architecture etc. carelessly drawn or out of keeping with the time it was supposed to portray.”
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1820 New England Mother and Child

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Attributed to Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) Mother and Child c 1820
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Thursday, November 18, 2010

Simple Cap on Early 19th-Century Pennsylvania Moravian Single Sister

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Unknown Artist, Moravian Single Sister, ca. 1810-1820. Moravian Historical Society, Nazareth, PA
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Tuesday, November 16, 2010

1835 Proper Lady with Lavender Ribbons

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Unknown Artist - Lady with Lavender Ribbons 1835
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Well, One More Early 19th-Century American Boy & His Faithful Dog...

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Milton W. Hopkins (1789-1844) Pierrepont Edward Lacey (1832 - after 1860) and His Dog, Gun
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1834 Mother & Very Sweet Little Boy in Two Rather Amazing Hats

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Unknown Artist - Agnes Frazee and Child 1834 (Probably Agnes Clark, Mrs Phineas Freeman Frazee Sr (1810-1891) of Brooklyn NY and then of Richland County, NJ, where he was a carriage maker. They had children in 1830, 1833, & 1834)
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Okay, It's Not a Girl, But It Is a Great 1852 Dog...

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Andrew B. Carlin (1816-1871) Samuel Taylor Middletown and His Great White Pyrenees Dog 1852
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African American Couple

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African American Couple attr to James H. Gillespie (fl 1828-1838) from Philadelphia c 1838
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Late 18th-Century Women Painted by James Earl (1761-1796)

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James Earl, the younger brother of artist Ralph Earl (1751-1801), also lived his brief life as an artist. He was born on the family farm in Leicester, Massachusettes, May 1, 1761, and died at age 35 in Charleston, South Carolina, August 18, 1796.

1792 Attributed to James Earl (1761-1796). Portrait of a Woman.

Earl painted in London between 1784 & 1794, when he left his young family and sailed to Charleston, South Carolina, painting there until dying suddenly of yellow fever.

1792 Attributed to Jame Earl (1761-1796). Portrait of Frances Horton. Reportedly painted in England.

Nothing is yet published from documented sources of James Earl’s early training, although it is speculated that James Earl either fled to England, when he was 17 with his brother in 1778, or met his brother there in 1784. Ralph Earl returned to Massachusetts in 1785, after a 7 year respite in England, while all that rebel furor cooled. James Earl's paintings after he arrived in Charleston seemed more relaxed & animated, than those he reportedly painted just before leaving London.

1790s Attributed to James Earl (1761-1796). Portrait of a Woman.

James Earl was exhibiting at the Royal Academy in London by 1787, where he continued to exhibit there every year, until he died, including the 2 years he had returned to the United States. He was a formal student at the Royal Academy in 1789.

1794 James Earl (1761-1796). Mrs. John Rogers (Elizabeth Rodman Rogers).

In the same year, Earl married Georgiana Caroline Pilkington Smyth (1759–1838), widow of the Loyalist Joseph Brewer Palmer Smyth of New Jersey & Westminister, England. The new Earl family produced three children: Clara, Phoebe (1790–1863), and Augustus (1793–1838). They also raised widow Smyths’ daughter, Elizabeth Ann, and son, William Henry, with whom Georgiana was pregnant, when Mr. Smyth died. Georgiana would have raised Phoebe & Augustus alone, as they were just toddlers, when their father died in far off Charleston.

1794 James Earl (1761-1796). Mrs. James Courtney.

One obituary published at James Earl's death in 1796, noted he had been in Charleston for about 2 years and that he had lived in London for ten years before that, making his arrival in England about 1784.

1794-6 James Earl (1761-1796). Sophia Bignon de Bonneville.

City Gazette
, Charleston, South Carolina 20 August 1796.
Died, on the morning og the 18th instant, Mr. James Earl, portrait painter, a native of Massachusettes. In the line of his profession he was excelled by non in America and by very few in Europe. His amiable disposition and agreeable manners, make his sudden death much lamented by all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance. He has left a wife and three children in London.


1794-96 James Earl (1761-1796). Rebecca Pritchard and her daughter Eliza.

James' children Phoebe & Augustus both became accomplished artists in England. Phoebe was a still-life artist who was appointed fruit & flower painter to Queen Adelaide, the wife of William IV.

Augustus was restless like his uncle & father. He traveled in the Mediterranean (1815–17), North America (1818–20), and South America (1820–24). From 1825-1828, Augustus, who spelled his surname Earle, journeyed to Australia & New Zealand, painting landscapes and portraits of aboriginies & colonial officials.

Like their father, Phoebe & Augustus exhibited at the Royal Academy during the early 1800s; and he also displayed works at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 1818, when he visited America.

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A Look at Paintings of American Women & Children Attributed to Ammi Phillips 1788-1865

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Ammi Phillips (1788–1865), a mostly self-taught New England portrait painter, was born in Colebrook, Connecticut.

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 14-year-old Mary Ann Gale 1815

In 1809 when he was 21, he traveled to Pittsfield, Massachusetts, where he advertised in the Berkshire Reporter that he was eager to & capable of painting portraits for potential clients.


Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) Mrs. Goodrich and Child

These early notices are the only ads he is known to have placed in any local newspaper. Phillips declared that he would portray his clients with “perfect shadows and elegantly dressed in the prevailing fashions of the day.” It was a promise that Phillips kept for the next 5 decades. His work changed as the fashion, furnishings, customs, & styles of everyday life in 19th-century America changed over time.

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 1812 Mrs. Sarah Cornwell Everests

Scholars speculate that his portraits may have been influenced by the work of Connecticut artist Reuben Moulthrop (1763-1814), who had painted Phillips’ namesake, the Reverend Ammi Ruhamah Robbins, in nearby Norfolk. Phillips seems to have known the work of Massachusetts artist, James Brown (active 1806-1808). An 1808 portrait by Brown appears to have served as the model for an 1811 portrait produced by Phillips.

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 1813 Patience Bolles Stoddard

His early portraits portray almost awkward, even stiff women with almond-shaped eyes and slightly off-center mouths. The method shows heavy outlining, a few props held in their hands, & simple, plain backgrounds. Over the following decades, most of his clients are holding something in their hands including sprigs of flowers; toys; books & letters; handmade needlework; and fashion accessories such as purses & even umberellas.

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) c 1814-19 Mrs. Crane

By the mid-1820s, Phillips' sitters are more Romantic following the aesthetic of the period. They are strong women with a delicate beauty clothed in the shimmering, pearly colors typical of the Romantic age. As one decade turned to another, Phillips' 1830s seated women became more realistic image reflecting the ideal Republican mother. They are seated and leaning forward from the waist and their determined faces sit atop long, graceful necks.

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) c 1815-19 Mrs. Stoddard Holding Bible

By the 1840s, Phillips had serious competition, less expensive photographic portraits. His portraits after that period reflect the rich, saturated colors of the Victorian years. His portraits are more staged reflecting popular studio photography. His women are more realistically portrayed bringing the life-like aspect of photography to the canvas.

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 1815 Harriet Leavens

He worked as an itinerant painter in Connecticut, Massachusetts, & New York over 5 decades painting hundreds of portraits. Between 1811 and 1862, Phillips created at least 600 paintings which are attributed to his hand that still exist.


Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 1816 Alice Slade

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 1817 Mrs. Tobias Steller

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 1818 Ruth Haynes Palmer

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 1820 Sarah Mynderse Campbell

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 1820 Rebecca Rouse (Mrs. Jonathan Eddy)

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 1820 Jane Ann Campbell

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 1824 Pauline Daring Denton

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 1824 Woman With a Shawl & Bonnet Holding Book

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 1825 A Lady

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 1835 Catherine DeWitt

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 1835 Mrs. Mayer and Daughter

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 1836 Mrs. Isaac Cox

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 1837 Mrs. Stephen Nottingham Ostrander with Child and Dog

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 1850 Emily Miner Fox

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 1850 A Lady

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) Catherine Stoutenburgh

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) Girl in Pink with Dog

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 1820 Jane Ann Campbell

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) Jane Marie Pells Phillips

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) Lady in Black Dress Holding Book

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) 1834 Andrew Jackson Tenbreoke

Ammi Phillips (1788-1865) Girl in Red Dress with Cat & Dog
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