Sunday, February 24, 2013

Photo Archives - African American Women & the Language of the Fan



Apparently, during the Victorian era, fans had a language of their own.

Alvan S. Harper (1847-1911) Tallahassee c 1884 State Library and Archives of Florida

1 The fan placed near the heart: “You have won my love”
2 A closed fan touching the right eye: “When may I be allowed to see you?”
3 The number of sticks shown answered the question: “At what hour?”

Alvan S. Harper (1847-1911) Tallahassee c 1884 State Library and Archives of Florida

4 Threatening movements with a fan closed: “Do not be so imprudent”
5 Half-opened fan pressed to the lips: “You may kiss me”
6 Hands clasped together holding an open fan: “Forgive me”

Alvan S. Harper (1847-1911) Tallahassee c 1884 State Library and Archives of Florida

7 Covering the left ear with an open fan: “Do not betray our secret”
8 Hiding the eyes behind an open fan: “I love you”
9 Shutting a fully opened fan slowly: “I promise to marry you”

Alvan S. Harper (1847-1911) Tallahassee c 1884 State Library and Archives of Florida

10 Drawing the fan across the eyes: “I am sorry”
11 Touching the finger to the tip of the fan: “I wish to speak with you”
12 Letting the fan rest on the right cheek: “Yes”

Alvan S. Harper (1847-1911) Tallahassee c 1884 State Library and Archives of Florida

13 Letting the fan rest on the left cheek: “No”
14 Opening and closing the fan several times: “You are cruel”
15 Dropping the fan: “We will be friends”

Alvan S. Harper (1847-1911) Tallahassee c 1884 State Library and Archives of Florida

16 Fanning slowly: “I am married”
17 Fanning quickly: “I am engaged”
18 Putting the fan handle to the lips: “Kiss me”

Alvan S. Harper (1847-1911) Tallahassee c 1884 State Library and Archives of Florida

19 Opening a fan wide: “Wait for me”
20 Placing the fan behind the head: “Do not forget me”
21 Placing the fan behind the head with finger extended: “Goodbye”

Alvan S. Harper (1847-1911) Tallahassee c 1884 State Library and Archives of Florida

22 Fan in right hand in front of face: “Follow me”
23 Fan in left hand in front of face: “I am desirous of your acquaintance”
24 Fan held over left ear: “I wish to get rid of you”

Alvan S. Harper (1847-1911) Tallahassee c 1884 State Library and Archives of Florida

25 Drawing the fan across the forehead: “You have changed”
26 Twirling the fan in the left hand: “We are being watched”
27 Twirling the fan I the right hand: “I love another”

Alvan S. Harper (1847-1911) Tallahassee c 1884 State Library and Archives of Florida

28 Carrying the open fan in the right hand: “You are too willing”
29 Carrying the open fan in the left hand: “Come and talk to me”
30 Drawing the fan through the hand: “I hate you!”
31 Drawing the fan across the cheek: “I love you!”
32 Presenting the fan shut: “Do you love me?”

Friday, February 22, 2013

Winslow Homer 1836-1910 paints dogs in a boat...



Winslow Homer (American artist, 1836-1910) Dogs in a Boat (also called Waiting for the Start) 1889

Thursday, February 21, 2013

Dogs & Cats & Hats & Children plus glimpses of a few great carpets attributed to Joseph Whiting Stock 1815–1855



Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) Jasper Raymond Rand 1844 (No grapes for the dog.)


Joseph Stock was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, working there most of his life. It is reported that he painting more than 900 works during his brief career. He sometimes shared a studio with local photographer O.H. Cooley and may have used some of his photographs as his portraits.


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) William James Coffin in a blue dress with a small white dog


At age 11, Stock suffered a crippling accident. He was later encouraged by a doctor to take up painting. He studied briefly with Francis White, a pupil of Chester Harding, but was mainly self-taught. He began his career by copying paintings of historical heroes, but soon switched to portraits, some painted as a memorial after their deaths. He was remarkable for his use of color.


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) Girl with Riticule and Rose c 1840


Attributed to Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) Amy Philpot in a Blue Dress wiwth Doll and Goldfish


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) Child with Basket


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) Baby in Wicker Basket 1840


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) Boy with a Dog


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) The Marshall Children


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) Young Girl 1837


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) Jane Henrietta Russell


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) Jane Tyler 1845


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) Addison C Rand 1844


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) Mary and Francis Wilcox


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) Baby Boy with Rattle, Whip, and Ball


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) Martha Otis Bullock 1841


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) Mary Jane Smith


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) Mother and Girl with Yellow Slippers c 1840


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) Samuel Son of Captain Gardener 1842


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) Boy with Whip and Sister with Flowers


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) The Farnum Children


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) Girl in Pink Dress Holding Miniature Basket 1838


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) Two Girlss with Red Dresses


Joseph Whiting Stock (American artist, 1815–1855) Self Portrait


Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Itinerant American Artist Joseph Goodhue Chandler



Joseph Goodhue Chandler (American artist, 1813 – 1884) Melinda Prouty Lamson-with son Nathaniel


An itinerant painter born in Massachusetts, Joseph Chandler was a typical 19th-century American folk artist traveling from place to place painting portraits. To the relief of modern-day curators, he signed & dated his paintings on the backs of the canvases.  His portraits of children capture the awkwardness of his sitters, and he often included toys & pets & perhaps a landscape in the background--something he did not do with his adult sitters.


Joseph Goodhue Chandler (American artist, 1813 – 1884) Boy and Girl in Rose Garden


Joseph Goodhue Chandler (American artist, 1813 – 1884) Mary Elizabeth Bennet


Joseph Goodhue Chandler (American artist, 1813 – 1884) Whiting and Joseph Griswold


Joseph Goodhue Chandler (American artist, 1813 – 1884) Frederick Eugene Bennet


Joseph Goodhue Chandler (American artist, 1813 – 1884) Sylvia Parsons of Conway, Massachusetts


Joseph Goodhue Chandler (American artist, 1813 – 1884) Drummer Boy


Joseph Goodhue Chandler (American artist, 1813 – 1884) Girl with Kitten


Joseph Goodhue Chandler (American artist, 1813 – 1884) Mrs Annis S Griffen


Joseph Goodhue Chandler (American artist, 1813 – 1884) Boy and his Dog


Joseph Goodhue Chandler (American artist, 1813 – 1884) Annis Griffen


Joseph Goodhue Chandler (American artist, 1813 – 1884) Harriet M Kendall 1845


Joseph Goodhue Chandler (American artist, 1813 – 1884) Charles H Sisson


Joseph Goodhue Chandler (American artist, 1813 – 1884) Small Boy with Dog

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Music & Dance in Early America

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18th-Century Dancing

Dance in the Morning

I danced in the morning when the world was begun,
And I danced in the moon and the stars and the sun,
And I came down from heaven and I danced on the earth,
At Bethlehem I had my birth.

Dance, then, wherever you may be.
I am the Lord of the dance, said he.
I'll lead you all wherever you may be,
I will lead you all in the Dance, said he.

Dancing in a Grove in the 18th-century

Sidney Carter (1915–2004) wrote these words in 1963 Britain, to a 19th-century Shaker melody, "Simple Gifts" by Joseph Brackett. The tune was written by American Joseph Brackett (1797–1882) who first joined the Shakers at Gorham, Maine, when his father's farm helped to form the nucleus of a new Shaker settlement. The song was largely unknown outside of American Shaker communities; until it became world famous thanks to its use in Aaron Copland's score for Martha Graham's ballet "Appalachian Spring," 1st performed in 1944. Copland used "Simple Gifts" a second time in 1950, in his first set of "Old American Songs" for voice & piano, which was later orchestrated.

Dancing in the 19th-century

19th-Century Dance
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